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Author Topic: intonation help les paul style guitar  (Read 2125 times)

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« on: January 25, 2008, 01:25:19 PM »
i know that i need to change the screws to adjust the saddles but how do i know when its right?

are there any specific methods like checking a harmonic against open string with a tuner?

Twinfan

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2008, 01:59:26 PM »
You need to check harmonic vs fretted note at 12 fret.

Move the saddle closer to the neck if the fretted note is flat, and vice versa  ;)

gwEm

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2008, 02:49:21 PM »
i personally just use a tuner pedal all the way. i test the string open, and then on the 12th fret - they should both be in tune. sometimes, if i'm suspicious, i'll check the intonation on other fret positions.

i was quite proud that when jonathan checked the intonation on one of my guitars only one of the strings was slightly out - just a cent or so, all the others were perfectly intonated.
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WezV

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2008, 04:51:23 PM »
tune the string up and compare the 12th fret note with 12th fret harmonic.  if the fretted note is flat the saddle goes towards the nut to shorten the string.  if its sharp it goes back.  adjust till they match

that will get you where you want to be but if you really want to be picky you can also  start checking other things.  SInce i got my strobe tuner i have been tuning the guitar so the 5th fret is in tune then comparing it with the fretted note at the 17th fret.  The same rule applies, if its flat at the 17th you shorten the string by moving the saddle forward till they match.

this takes a bit longer but ensures good intonation over more of the fretboard

PhilKing

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2008, 05:59:11 PM »
Also when you do this make sure you have new strings on the guitar.
So many pickups, so little time

Philly Q

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2008, 07:38:10 PM »
To remember which way to move the saddle when comparing harmonics against fretted notes, it's

FFF - Fret Flat, Forward
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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2008, 07:38:36 PM »
cheers guys.

Amazingly my guitar is really close to say it hasnt had a set up for a good few months.

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2008, 07:40:57 PM »
cheers guys.

Amazingly my guitar is really close to say it hasnt had a set up for a good few months.

Henk

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2008, 09:26:48 AM »
Quote from: WezV
SInce i got my strobe tuner i have been tuning the guitar so the 5th fret is in tune then comparing it with the fretted note at the 17th fret.  The same rule applies, if its flat at the 17th you shorten the string by moving the saddle forward till they match.

this takes a bit longer but ensures good intonation over more of the fretboard


I do this too because i tune my guitar on hearing and not on the tuner mostly. If you tune on a tuner then its better to base intonation on open string sound(or however you tune usually), this way you get a consistant tuning and therefore intonation.

Consistent tuning is 90% of your intonation.

And by the way, if you use a tuner please check if its correct at reading the proper frequency, most tuners ive used are off. Actually everyone should at least have one (A) tuning fork around, just ask the shopkeeper if you could try a couple, there is some very slight sample variation, one always seemed to sound louder and clearer to me at least.
Mules in '76 Gibson custom with maple neck.

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2008, 05:44:24 PM »
hmmm string broke so ive restrung and redone it and the G string is 10 cents sharp but the screw wont go any further.....

any suggestions?

Henk

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2008, 11:39:55 AM »
You need to intonate with well played in strings, probably thats it.

If you have a tunimatic bridge, check if you can reverse the saddle so the sharp side is facing the direction you need to srew it for proper intonation.

If not, just start all over again, helps sometimes.
Mules in '76 Gibson custom with maple neck.

Twinfan

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2008, 12:06:01 PM »
Quote from: Henk
You need to intonate with well played in strings, probably thats it.


With all due respect, that's rubbish  :lol:

I always intonate with fresh strings - used ones are affected by dirt/grime/sweat/rust and you don't get a true vibration.  If I'm really bothered, I'll sometimes check and tweak the intonation before a gig if I'm not putting fresh strings on.

Setting it with fresh strings, and checking it every time you change them is a reasonable enough routine  :)

Henk

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intonation help les paul style guitar
« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2008, 03:41:34 PM »
Magic then, i at least cant intonate correctly without playing in a fresh string first, at least the ones i use detune very quickly at first. I didnt say old strings, just well playd in. Cant imagine you not playing a fresh set in before jumping a stage, or well at least i hate tuning in the middle of a song :oops:

But anyway, if it works well enough, who cares.......
Mules in '76 Gibson custom with maple neck.