Username: Password:

Author Topic: Evertune bridge?  (Read 6446 times)

nfe

  • Welterweight
  • ****
  • Posts: 2508
  • Smrt fašizmu, sloboda narodu!
    • Damnation Festival
Re: Evertune bridge?
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2011, 02:34:11 PM »
Such are the limitations of frets.

I don't consider it a massive problem, though, in day to day playing it's not so bad, but what the chap with the 335 was saying is true, if you're layering lots of parts in different positions things do start to get a bit horrible without constant retuning to suit.
To avoid confusion, please assume all words above are jovial and follow the prefix "In my opinion".

mecca777

  • Bantamweight
  • **
  • Posts: 186
Re: Evertune bridge?
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2011, 07:40:20 PM »
Such are the limitations of frets.

I don't consider it a massive problem, though, in day to day playing it's not so bad, but what the chap with the 335 was saying is true, if you're layering lots of parts in different positions things do start to get a bit horrible without constant retuning to suit.

Fair enough, but as you say that's a problem with the physical properties of a guitar; surely the Evertune wouldn't fix that? I know that plenty of people use things like the Buzz Feiten system, the Earvana nut or various "wobbly fret" systems to improve the compromised temperament of the fretboard, but I don't see how an auto-tuning bridge could compensate for intonation in other fret positions unless you reset it for tension while you barre a chord in that position, and then you're back to the problem of retuning for layering parts.


nfe

  • Welterweight
  • ****
  • Posts: 2508
  • Smrt fašizmu, sloboda narodu!
    • Damnation Festival
Re: Evertune bridge?
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2011, 10:19:44 PM »
I've not read owt about this system and only looked at the first couple videos, so I've no idea how effectively it addresses the issues in higher registers, but the chap with the 335 seems to think it solves them. Whereas the various bent frets, earvana and Buzz Feiten solutions have no effect.
To avoid confusion, please assume all words above are jovial and follow the prefix "In my opinion".

webweave

  • Junior Flyweight
  • *
  • Posts: 11
Re: Evertune bridge?
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2011, 04:47:05 PM »
I watched the videos and read the web site. They don't really tell you the whole deal on how it works but from the images and description I seems to be 6 individual springs, each spring is connected to a single saddle. Imagine a one string Floyd rose bridge six times. There's no trem bar because you'd have to rock the entire bridge/springs to make that work.

Other than not having a wammy it looks like a good system with lots of easy adjustment. I have no idea why you would put it on a Tele as nobody ever picked up a Tele and expected perfect intonation. If you do put this on a Tele it won't sound like a Tele anymore. (at least not a 3 saddle bridge) It just seems a very odd combination to me. Springs on a Tele???

One of the videos shows the back of a 22 fret Strat Deluxe. It looks to me like the spring cavity was routed a lot wider to accommodate the six springs and the replacement for the spring claw is also rather huge and is fastened with large screws. I have serious reservations about this system. This would cause problems on many strats that I have worked on or seen. The front to back routing of the Strats I've seen tends to be less than perfectly accurate and there is a likelihood of cutting through a void. Also thinning the area around the bridge mounting points IS likely to change the sound of the guitar. There's just not enough extra wood on the average Strat for 100% success (on most Strats that were made with factory trems).

If somebody wanted to try this I'd say start with hardtail body. Of course you have to think about what is changed when you put springs on a fixed bridge guitar and still have no wammy.

I'm going to go with the other posters above that said if you have an annoying intonation or tuning problem you'd be better off starting with the traditional approaches like working on the nut, bridge, frets, tuners, neck first before embarking on the invasive one way procedure installing this bridge. (and still have the original problems)