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Author Topic: What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster  (Read 13363 times)

Elliot

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« on: November 11, 2005, 06:37:44 PM »
As I understand (from the SD website) it the Broadcaster pickup design was changed in about 1952 - what was the change?  how did it affect the tone?

Do BKPs make both types of style in the Country Boy or is it one or the other?
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Ratrod

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2005, 07:18:12 PM »
I believe the broadcaster only had one pickup. They stopped using the name because Gretsch made a drumkit called broadcaster. Then the guitars became no-casters and later telecaster.
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Elliot

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2005, 07:39:29 PM »
No the broadcaster had two pickups, the Esquire had one pickup - but I understand that the Broadcaster and the Nocaster (which were Broadcasters with the word 'broadcaster' cut from the Fender decal transfer) had a different design of pickup to the 1952 tele.  Is this the case?
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Steve-Mr Pig 2U

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2005, 08:10:33 PM »
The broadcaster had quite a high output pickup, our piledriver. I think that the line was dropped because of the radio system called the broadcaster (strange I know but Im pretty shure its true!)

indysmith

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2005, 11:30:08 PM »
Quote from: Steve-Mr Pig 2U
I think that the line was dropped because of the radio system called the broadcaster (strange I know but Im pretty shure its true!)


I'd understood that another guitar company (gretsch i think) already had the name trade-marked, and were threatening to sue
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indysmith

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2005, 11:34:09 PM »
"In 1937 Gretsch had trademarked the name "BroadKaster" for a line of drums. After advertising the Broadcaster in music trade papers in February1951, Gretsch took notice and sent Fender a telegram asking them to change their name. Therefore Fender was forced to drop the name Broadcaster. Starting in February 1951, Fender cut the word "Broadcaster" off of their headstock decals. These models (February 1951 to summer 1951) are known as "NoCasters". Starting in the summer of 1951, Fender adopted the name "Telecaster" for this model, and started using new decals after all the old clipped decals were used."
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Elliot

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2005, 09:51:29 AM »
My book of Fender history confirms Indysmith to be correct - Wow I knew broadcaster pups were put onlap steels but I didn't realise they were such high output.  I assume they were Alnico II or III being made in 1950 (in fact I think Fender's Nocaster pups are AIII)?
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Steve-Mr Pig 2U

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2005, 11:00:59 AM »
Well, I dont know where I heard that from then!
Up to around '57 fender used an ungraded alnico, closest to modern day alnico III.

The amazing Phil

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2005, 07:03:07 AM »
Quote from: Steve-Mr Pig 2U
The broadcaster had quite a high output pickup, our piledriver. I think that the line was dropped because of the radio system called the broadcaster (strange I know but Im pretty shure its true!)


Broadcasters had that much oomph to them? That really suprises me what with them being from 1950, surely that much power would've kicked amps into overdrive a lot easier and made these guitars a lot more sought after to the likes of Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page who both had stints with teles in rock groups?

I gotta admit, I've been considering a set and something to put them in for a while now.

Ratrod

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2005, 03:12:18 PM »
Now I'm getting curious. I'd like to hear some Piledriver clips.

And did Status Quo put Broadcaster pups in their Tele's then?
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Tim

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What difference between Broadcaster and Telecaster
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2005, 08:03:49 PM »
Broadcaster p/ups came off lapsteels and we really quite hot-you woudn't want a tinny lapsteel now would you :D Usually @DC12.5K, so serious welly, it was until later in the '50s that the wind dropped back closer to what we know now and even then it has yo yo'ed around quite a bit.
Tim
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