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Author Topic: Suhr style HSS wiring with neck on and bridge split  (Read 194 times)

kdas3

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Suhr style HSS wiring with neck on and bridge split
« on: May 08, 2020, 05:09:29 PM »
Hi everyone,

I recently modified the wiring scheme that Suhr uses in their HSS guitars to include a neck on and bridge split option. The purpose of the Suhr style HSS wiring is to ensure that the humbucker sees a regular humbucker load (usually 500k vol and 500k tone = 250k load), and the single coils see a regular single coil load (usually 250k vol and 250k tone = 125k load). To do this, they utilise a 5 way superswitch (4P5T) which introduces resistors in parallel from hot to ground, in order to modify the total load in the circuit.

My modifications to the Suhr diagram include:
  • Neck on switch via push/pull on Tone 1.
  • Bridge split via push/pull on Tone 2.
  • Tone 1 affects positions 3-5 and Tone 2 affects positions 1-2. Here position 1 is bridge humbucker.
  • A modified treatment of the bridge slug positions. Suhr treats the bridge slug coil like a regular single coil. I found that by doing this, the bridge slug was way too dark (using a bareknuckle humbucker). Maybe Suhr humbuckers are created specifically for HSS guitars, so their wiring makes sense in their guitars. And for you techies, in my wiring diagram the mid/bridge slug position sees a 250k load, and the bridge slug position sees a 200k load.

I have included versions of the wiring diagram with and without switches. Also, I have implemented this wiring, so it does work. And some others from other forums have too.

Cheers.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2020, 05:17:10 PM by kdas3 »

kdas3

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Re: Suhr style HSS wiring with neck on and bridge split
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2020, 05:13:37 AM »
Some people are confused about the total load in the circuit.

Usually a humbucker sees a 500k volume and 500k tone which is a total 250k load (calculate in parallel). And a single coil sees a 250k volume and 250k tone which is a total 125k load. So the Suhr wiring addresses this by putting a 500k resistor in parallel from hot to ground when necessary.

E.g., in the Suhr wiring for the neck single you have 500K vol, 250K tone1, 500K resistor. Let T be total load. Then 1/T = 1/500 + 1/250 + 1/500. Solve to get T = 125.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2020, 06:59:56 AM by kdas3 »